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Wildlife Education - A Directory of Qualified Wildlife Removal Professionals

How to remove a dead bat

First thing you need you know, is that if you call animal control, they will most likely only tell you that you should pick it up t and throw it away by yourself. The second important thing is, that bats can carry diseases. If you have a bat in your home, you are at risk of contracting rabies. However, this isn’t something you should worry about too much, in case you haven’t been in physical contact with the bat or its feces. In case that you have, give your doctor a visit and get some shots.



Basically, you should just discard the bat and use some antibacterial cleaner to disinfect the area. Make sure to remove all of its feces and thoroughly clean the entire area around the place you found it. Also, while doing this, cover your mouth in a way that will protect you from inhaling the air around the dead bat. This is to avoid inhaling spores from bat’s feces and in case it has started to decompose.

Bats usually carry two types of diseases that are transferable to humans. One of them is rabies, but to contract it, the bat would have to have been alive and, and the disease would somehow need to get into your blood. However, rabies in bats is not as common as most people think. In fact, believe it or not, than 1% of wild bats might carry rabies.

Another disease bats carry can be contracted in an area where there are many bat feces (guano) in an enclosed area where there is no ventilation. In that case, the disease could get transferred if the spores from the guano are inhaled. Again, the disease is not transferred through a dead bat in your room.

How to actually remove a dead bat from your living area? Put on some gloves and grab a bag. Remove the bat by placing it in a bag and throw it out. After you’ve removed the bat once, make sure to bat-proof your house. This means, sealing any openings wider than roughly ½ inch from your windows and roof. Remember, even though bats might seem large, thanks to the wideness of their wings, they are, in fact, quite small and tender beings. Bats are capable of passing through the narrowest holes- because their actual bodies are, generally, small. Inspect your house for colonies of bats, make sure there are no baby-bats also (maternity season for bats is during the summer). Check your home for holes and block them. There are always humane ways to get the bats out of the house. You should never kill them, because bats are very important for the ecosystem. Go back to the How to get rid of bats home page.

If you need bats help, click my Nationwide list of bats removal experts for a pro near you.



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