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Wildlife Education - A Directory of Qualified Deer Removal Professionals

How to Kill Deer with Poison



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How to Kill a Deer
Deer are notorious pests to some people, largely because they eat landscaping vegetation and spread deer ticks. They also pose risks to drivers. You can deal with your deer problem in a number of ways. You may want to consider using one of these deer repellents first, before resorting to killing deer. Killing them is not easy, but it can be done.

Shooting
Killing deer by shooting, either via rifle or bow and arrow, is really the only acceptable way to kill unwanted deer. In most US states, you must have a hunting license to do so. There are restrictions regarding seasons and types of acceptable weapons, depending on where you live. Consult local laws in your area. If you are looking for a fastest solution, you can shoot the deer. A pellet gun will not work. A high powered rifle is best, and only when used in the hands of a trained and responsible user. A crossbow or compound bow is often suggested as it is accurate and silent. Bow and arrow is the only legal option in some areas. You can take a shot from a good distance away and ensure a quick death for the deer. Unless you live in a rural area where your neighbors are way down the road, shooting with a gun or rifle is often not an option. If you can shoot with a gun in your area, that is an option to consider, and of course by far the most popular method for killing deer.

Poison
Poisoning deer is generally regarded as inhumane and is federally prohibited in all 50 states. Some people think that poisoning animals like the deer can be attempted when other means have failed. There are various poisons that could be applied to corn sets or salt licks that deer frequent. I will not list the poisons here. This method will cause a slow, painful death for the animal. Poison is also harmful around your children, house pets and garden. You do not want to risk your loved ones ingesting it.

There is not a specifically designed poison for deer. In many places, using a poison intended for any animal not specifically listed on the product is illegal. Rat poison is often used with limited success and again, is not recommended for legality issues.

Commercial gas cartridges are available at hardware or home and garden stores and sold for animals like moles or gophers. People place them in the burrows and make sure all entrances are sealed. These cartridges release sulfur gas and carbon monoxide and will kill any animal inside. Of course this won't work on deer, because they don't live in burrows!

Some people might consider poisoning them through other, more natural, means as well. Castor beans or mole plants can be dropped into the deer’ paths. You should never use these around small children or family pets as they are highly poisonous. Elderberry cuttings are another option. The stems and leaves can release cyanide and that is fatal to deer.

Lethal Traps
Body-gripping traps are a fatal method sometimes used to dispose of deer. Find a set where the deer pass through, and place the trap in that area. These traps need to be set with a stake to ensure safety.

Body-gripping traps are often difficult to set and can have dangerous consequences to the person trying to set them. If you must use them it is best to have a professional set them for you. This will help you avoid killing yourself during setting, but it won't avoid killing any pets that roam free in your neighborhood. Keep in mind that in many states this kind of trap is illegal. I would never ever attempt to use a foot hold or body grip trap to kill deer.

Things to Avoid
Always avoid any illegal means of disposal if you can. This means poison you can buy for an animal other than a deer. There is no registered or legal deer poison. There is also no real effective deer trap sold on the market. If you do use a bear or coyote trap, you will want to make sure any trap is set in a specific spot where you will get only the deer. You don't want to kill a pet or any other animal. Many people have accidentally trapped skunks with lethal traps only to have no idea of how to dispose of them. At the least, there will be an awful smell. At worst, you will need to find a way to get the smell off you.

You do not have to kill deer to get rid of them. Your best bet is to deter them with repellents such as putrid egg whites, or motion sensitive water sprayers. Fencing also works. Hire a professional trapper if you want help coming up with a plan and installing these products. Some people use synthetic animal urine to get them to abandon their home or place used cat litter around the garden for the same effect, but this doesn't work well for deer. Placing ammonia soaked sponges also won't encourage them to relocate.

Make every effort to get rid of deer without killing them. There are many humane ways to cure your deer problem. Use them first.

More in-detail how-to deer removal articles:
Information about how to keep deer away - prevention techniques.
Article about are deer dangerous to people - analysis.

This site is intended to provide deer education and information about how to kill deer with poison, so that you can make an informed decision if you need to deal with a deer problem. This site provides many deer control articles and strategies, if you wish to attempt to solve the problem yourself. If you are unable to do so, which is likely with many cases of deer removal, please go to the home page and click the USA map, where I have wildlife removal experts listed in over 500 cites and towns, who can properly help you kill your nuisance deer. Click here to read more about how to get rid of deer.

© 2001-2014     Website content & photos by Trapper David     Feel free to email me with questions: david@wildlifeanimalcontrol.com